Teen smoking rate worse in Europe

Europe may be leading the effort to stamp out smoking in public places, but it has the highest incidence of teen smokers in the world, a study says.

Nearly 18% of Europeans aged 13 to 15 are smokers, more than twice the global average of 8.9%, according to the paper, published online on Friday by the British medical weekly The Lancet.

When other tobacco use was factored in, such as chewing tobacco and snuff, the Americas came top with 22.2%, followed by Europe, with 19.8%; the global average was 17.3%.

In the Americas, more girls smoke than boys, and there is only a small difference between the genders in Europe – 19.9% among boys, and 15.7% among girls.

American students have the highest the proportion reporting lifetime use of amphetamines (9 percent), a rate that is three times the average in Europe (3 percent).
The study by the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction reported that 38 per cent of French 15- and 16-year olds said they had smoked at least one cigarette during the past month, up from 30 per cent during 2007.

The Europe-wide average is 28 per cent.

About 100,000 young people in 36 countries were polled by the monitoring center.

The proportion of smokers among France’s 15- and 16-year olds is significantly higher than the proportion of smokers within this age group in most other European countries, according to a story in The Connexion quoting a new study.

France had the sixth highest smoking rate among the target group; behind Latvia, the Czech Republic, Croatia, Albania, Montenegro and Ireland.

The number of teenagers in France who smoke is significantly higher than in most other European countries, a new study shows.

France had the sixth highest teenage smoking rate, behind Latvia, the Czech Republic, Croatia, Albania, Montenegro and Ireland.

It was found that 38% of French teens (aged 15 or 16) said they had smoked at least one cigarette in the past month, up from 30% in 2007. The Europe-wide average is 28%.

Some 100,000 young people in 36 countries were polled by the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction.

A recent study by the French anti-smoking body CNCT found that thousands of tobacconists were illegally selling cigarettes to children as young as 12.

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